Current reading on Special Warfare-Guerrilla Warfare

clip_image002U.S. Army Special Warfare: Its Origins: Revised Edition

~ Alfred H. Paddock Jr.

“Based on exhaustive research in formerly classified documents, Paddock examines the U.S. Army’s activities in psychological and unconventional warfare during World War II, Korea, and the early Cold War to determine the impetus for, and origins of, the "special warfare" capability established at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He describes the key role played by Major General Robert A. McClure, the "father of Army special warfare," to convince often reluctant military and civilian leaders to rebuild psychological warfare forces dissipated after World War II and to create Special Forces the Army’s first formal organization to conduct guerrilla warfare. Paddock also clearly establishes the influence of concepts pioneered by the Office of Strategic Services on the original design of Special Forces.”

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American Guerrilla: The Forgotten Heroics of Russell W. Volckmann ~ Mike Guardia

“In 1950, Volckmann wrote two Army field manuals: "Operations Against Guerrilla Forces" and "Organization and Conduct of Guerrilla Warfare," though today few realize he was their author. Together, they became the Army’s first handbooks outlining the precepts for both special warfare and counter-guerrilla operations.  At a time when U.S. military doctrine was conventional in outlook, Volckmann marketed the ideas of guerrilla warfare as a critical force multiplier for any future conflict, ultimately securing the establishment of the Army’s first special operations unit-the 10th Special Forces Group.”

Both books are very interesting so far.

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Female Green Berets?

First female soldier in Green Beret training fails to complete the course

The first female soldier to participate in the Army’s initial training program for the Green Berets — side-by-side with men — has failed to complete the course this week, The Washington Times has learned.

The enlisted soldier is the first woman to attend the U.S. Army Special Forces Assessment and Selection (SFAS), the first step toward earning the Special Forces tab and the coveted Green Beret. The Times reported in July that two female officer candidates have been accepted to attend an SFAS class that begins in the spring.

I’ll once again go into the dangerous territory of women in the military. The Washington Times reports that the first female soldier to participate in SFAS has failed to complete the course. First off, it appears she made it to the Star Exam. All former SFAS candidates and older SF Soldiers know the STAR. It is a tough land navigation course, unlike any other I’ve ever come across. Bones Fork anyone? So, on the surface she did a hell of a job. Many if not most don’t make it past this part of Selection.

I am not a fan of Women on Special Forces Operational Detachments (SFODA). I think the mission of SF soldiers doesn’t normally require the skills that women bring to the table and the potential downside is too high. That said I’m not against women in combat roles or Special Operations roles. But the skills they bring to the fight should be addressed and how those skills best fit into the total force or Special Operations.

I have no doubt there are women who can and probably will pass the various selection and training course for the services combat roles. But why? Is the return on the investment worth it?

Female Engagement Teams (FET) or Cultural Support Teams (CST) which served with Special Forces and SEAL teams in Afghanistan Do seem to be a good idea. The Marines have their version also. I didn’t work directly with any FET teams so I can’t say from experience how it worked out. But I can certainly see how they could be very useful and with additional training in Unconventional Warfare a very important tool in the total toolbox.

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Remember many women were key players in the French resistance, granted that was more out of necessity.

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I feel for the women of today’s military and how the political class is using them for their own agenda.

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/sep/14/first-female-soldier-in-green-beret-training-fails/

https://www.sofx.com/2016/09/15/first-female-soldier-green-beret-training-fails-complete-course-washington-times/

Special Forces huh?

Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald has admitted that he lied about serving in the special operations forces in a conversation with a homeless veteran that was caught on camera earlier this year.

We keep picking only the best to represent us. 

But then again, hell aren’t we all special?  I mean the Army went to cool ass black berets because everyone should feel as special as Army Rangers. 

Robert MacDonald was picked to clean up the VA not for his military service. Oh wait..  hum  Well anyway truth really isn’t that important in the big picture.  As long as he contributes to the correct narrative. 

Look folks all kidding aside, you don’t misremember shit like that. 

31 US and 7 Afghan die in crash

Kabul: A total of 31 members of the US Special Forces have died in a helicopter crash in eastern Afghanistan along with seven Afghans, a statement from Afghan President Hamid Karzai’s office said Saturday.

"The president of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Hamid Karzai expressed condolences over a NATO helicopter crash and the deaths of 31 members of US special forces," the statement said.

The crash late Friday represents the biggest death toll in a single incident for international forces in Afghanistan since the start of the war in 2001.
Seven Afghans were also killed in the crash, the statement said, taking the total death toll in the incident to 38.

The Afghan defence ministry said they were also special forces.

Update:

WASHINGTON — The Associated Press has learned that more than 20 Navy SEALs from the unit that killed Osama bin Laden were among those lost in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.

The operators from SEAL Team Six were flown by a crew of the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment. That’s according to one current and one former U.S. official. Both spoke on condition of anonymity because families are still being notified of the loss of their loved ones.

One source says the team was thought to include 22 SEALs, three Air Force air controllers, seven Afghan Army troops, a dog and his handler, and a civilian interpreter, plus the helicopter crew.

The sources thought this was the largest single loss of life ever for SEAL Team Six, known as the Naval Special Warfare Development Group.

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